Short and Sweet

Yap stone money inflation

photo of yap stone money in various sizes
Monetarily speaking, everything progressed smoothly on the island of Yap where large stones weighing hundreds of pounds were transported around to serve as money. That is until something unforeseen happened to the value of the money. For centuries, the stones served in exchange because there wasn’t much of this type of rock on Yap itself.

The depreciation of the stone money began when an enterprising Western businessman realized he could produce stone money cheaply and in copious quantities on a neighboring island and transport it to Yap, where it could be used to procure goods in demand elsewhere. In other words, this oceanic cousin of John Law printed Yap stone money to buy his wares at what might be called a “favorable” discount. By this process, the yap stone money was debased until it became worthless. Little did the citizens of Yap know that they were deprived of their wealth, and their money destroyed, by the process of monetary inflation.


Looking to protect your savings against debasement of the local currency?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE

ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Coins & bullion since 1973

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

‘The next decade will belong to gold.’

“Few people acknowledge that gold remains the superior asset of the 21st century,” writes London-based analyst Charlie Morris in a recently published Atlas Trust Gold Report, “nearly twice as profitable as the S&P 500. But it was a game of two halves with gold obliterating equities in the first and the S&P smashing gold in the second. Still, gold wins overall. I can’t help but think the next decade will belong to gold. After all, the S&P 500 trades at a lofty valuation by historical standards, while gold doesn’t. The main reason I have confidence that gold will win the 2020s is that this almighty asset bubble all around us will implode, and the crowded trades will disappoint the most. Gold is far from being crowded.”

In support of Morris’ contention that “the next decade will belong to gold,” we offer four instructive charts from Merk Investments. The first two show the close correlation between real rates of return and the price of gold. In the past, the declining real rate of return was driven by the rate side of the equation. Now, rising inflation expectations have become the primary influence – a development likely to focus increased attention on the yellow metal. The third chart shows the relationship between long-term growth in the global money supply and rising gold prices. Central bank stimulus is now feeding into the global money supply – something it did not do during the Great Financial Crisis (2008). As a result, we might see an acceleration in both trend lines – money supply and gold. The fourth and final chart is by far the most intriguing. It matches up the cyclical lows posted in 1999 and 2015 and shows gold now closely tracking the trajectory of its twenty-year secular bull market begun in the early 2000s.

pverlay line chart showing the price of gold and the real rate of return 1995 to present

Overlay line chart showing gold and real reates 2018 to present

overlay line chart showing the globql money supply and gold 2000 to present

overlay line chart comparing 1999 gold bull market trend with 2015
Charts courtesy of Merk Investments • • • Click to enlarge

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Economic insecurity is becoming the new hallmark of old age

In the United States,” writes Katherine S. Newman and Rebecca Hayes Jacobs for The Nation, “economic security in old age was seen, for a long time, as both a social issue and a national obligation. From the birth of Social Security to the end of the 20th century, the common assumption has been that we have a shared responsibility to secure a decent retirement for our citizens. Yet that notion is weakening rapidly. Instead, we have started to hear echoes of the mantra of self-reliance that characterized welfare ‘reform’ in the 1990s: You alone are in charge of your retirement; if you wind up in poverty in your old age, you have only your own inability to plan, save, and invest to blame.”

line chart showing the stock market's performance 1925-1955

Chart courtesy of MacroTrends.net • • • Click to enlarge

Some compare today’s stock market psychology to the period just before 2008. Others compare it to the 1920s when everything was hunky-dory until suddenly it wasn’t – perhaps a more apt comparison. Too many are “all-in” with respect to stocks in their Individual Retirement Accounts hoping to accumulate as much capital as possible without regard to the potential downside. As the chart above amply illustrates, the stock market did not recover from the losses accumulated between 1929 and 1933 until the mid-1950s, almost 25-years later – a fragment of stock market history lost to time.

Some will rely on the fact that stocks recovered nicely once the Fed launched the 2009 bailout. We should keep in mind though that many prominent Wall Street analysts have warned that the Fed no longer has the firepower it did then. The financial markets and economy are much more vulnerable as a result – all of which brings us back to the notions of self-reliance and taking personal responsibility for our retirement plans. If you find yourself among the group that thinks hedging a stock market downturn to be in your best interest, we can help you effectively structure a gold and silver diversification as part of your retirement plan to hedge that possibility.


Are you ready to hedge a Wall Street meltdown in your retirement plan?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK:1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Copernicus on the debasement of money

Image of 8¢ stamp depicting Copernicus holding representation of heliocentric earth orbit

“Although there are countless scourges which in general debilitate kingdoms, principalities, and republics, the four most important (in my judgment) are dissension, [abnormal] mortality, barren soil, and debasement of the currency. The first three are so obvious that nobody is unaware of their existence. But the fourth, which concerns money, is taken into account by few persons and only the most perspicacious. For it undermines states, not by a single attack all at once, but gradually and in a certain covert manner.” – Copernicus, Essay on the Coinage of Money (1526)

Few know that Copernicus applied his genius to the insidious effects of currency debasement. The ground-breaking essay linked above probably influenced both John Maynard Keynes (See below) and Thomas Gresham of “bad money drives out good” fame. Supply Side Blog’s Ralph Benko says Copernicus’ essay “has been translated into English several times yet those translations remained difficult to obtain for students of the monetary arts and sciences. It has remained mostly the property of elite historians.” Above we link Edward Rousen’s translation that you might keep company with the knowledgeable elite.

It cost 8¢ to mail a one-ounce letter in 1973 as indicated by the commemorative Copernicus stamp shown above. It costs 55¢ today – an illustration of his assertion that currency debasement “undermines states, not by a single attack all at once, but gradually and in a certain covert manner.” The post office increased the cost of mailing a letter by 5¢ – to 55¢ – beginning in 2019.


“By a continuing process of inflation governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. By this method they not only confiscate, but they confiscate arbitrarily; and, while the process impoverishes many, it actually enriches some. The sight of this arbitrary rearrangement of riches strikes not only at security, but at confidence in the equity of the existing distribution of wealth.” – John Maynard Keynes, The Economic Consequences of Peace (1919)


Are you looking to prevent your savings from being attacked in a covert manner?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK:1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

 

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Thinking in big numbers

Big numbers do not register with most people. Thinking in millions is difficult. Billions are a major challenge, trillions nearly impossible. The reason for this, says Wall Street Journal columnist Jo Craven McGinty, is that big numbers are usually offered in isolation without the benefit of comparison – numbers without an appropriate anchor, so to speak. People need some sort of measuring stick to give the numbers meaning. She recently offered some interesting tactics for making big numbers meaningful. Here is one of them:

“[T]hink of it [big numbers],” she says, “in terms of time, like Richard Panek, a professor at Goddard College in Vermont and a Guggenheim fellow in science writing. There are 1 million seconds in roughly 11½ days. There are 1 billion seconds in around 31 years. And there are 1 trillion seconds in around 31,000 years.”

Now the new Secretary of the Treasury is telling us that we need to ‘act big’ and worry about the $$28,427,698,645,832.16 (as of August 2, 2021) national debt later.


Do you find the Biden administration’s approach to big numbers a bit unnerving?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK:1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

The Exter Inverted Pyramid of Global Liquidity

Exter's inverted debt pyramid with derivatives at top and gold on the bottom

“[Exter’s Inverted] Pyramid stands upon its apex of gold, which has no counter-party risk nor credit risk and is very liquid.  As you work higher into the pyramid, the assets get progressively less creditworthy and less liquid. . .[In a financial crisis] this bloated structure pancakes back down upon itself in a flight to safety.  The riskier, upper parts of the inverted pyramid become less liquid (harder to sell), and – if they can be sold at all – change hands at markedly lower prices as the once continuous flow of credit that had levitated those prices dries up.” – Lewis Johnson, Capital Wealth Advisor’s Lewis Johnson


Looking to hedge the dangers lurking in the bond market?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Beware the new mantra that stocks are a good inflation hedge

“So, to be clear, this April really was cruel,” writes John Authers in his regular Bloomberg column, “In terms of the basic economic numbers that affect us most, it was the cruelest month for the U.S. in many decades. It was only one month. It is way too soon to proclaim the beginning or end of a major economic trend, on the base of the data we have so far. But April’s data were not only very, very bad, but also very, very surprising. They need to be confronted and understood.” Authers is surprised at the markets’ muted reaction to “a bad unemployment number followed by a bad inflation number.” He warns that if inflation does take root, stocks have plenty of room to fall further.

The chart below shows what happened in the 1970s once investors realized that inflation was not “transitory” but entrenched instead. Stocks drifted sideways for most of the decade, managing only a 4.78% gain. Gold, on the other hand, gained 1592%. We sometimes overlook the fact that stocks peaked in the late 1960s, just before the inflation began. Nearly twenty years of sideways to down action followed. Stocks started and ended the 1970s at 1000 while runaway inflation raged.

Gold and Stocks
(In percent, 1970-1979)

overlay line chart showing the returns on gold and stocks during the 1970s

Chart courtesy of TradingView.com • • • Click to enlarge

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Novice precious metals owners must decide
where they stand on this important issue

visualization of gold as a stratgic move in portfolio planning

“Precious metals are and always have been the ultimate insurance,” says Pro Aurum’s Robert Hartman in an interview with Claudio Grass. “They provide protection both against state failures and against mistakes in the monetary policy of the central banks. Every investor who looks into the history books sees that both have happened over and over again in the past centuries. From that perspective, investing in physical gold and silver is a common-sense precaution and a necessary part of any wealth preservation plan. Investors and ordinary savers ignore this at their peril and the failure to include precious metals in one’s portfolio is pure negligence.”

There are essentially two broad schools of thought alive and well in the gold market. The first holds that crisis is around the corner and, as a result, precious metals should be owned to profit from the event. The second holds that crisis is a permanent fixture in the market dynamic and that the portfolio should always include precious metals as the ultimate safe haven. The first buyer sees precious metals as investment products, i.e., buy now and sell later when the time is right. The second sees gold and silver, like Hartmann, as insurance products to be held for the long run. Some combine the two, allocating one part of their precious metals portfolio for trading purposes and another as a permanent, or semi-permanent, store of value. The novice precious metals owner must decide where he or she stands in this regard because it determines, in turn, which products to include in the portfolio and to what degree.

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Looking to prepare your portfolio for whatever uncertainty lies ahead?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE

ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Of 17th-century tulips, 21st-century stocks and ageless gold

antique painting of a fool trading his gold for tulip bulbs

During the Dutch Tulipmania, the price of one special, rare type of tulip bulb called Semper Augustus sold for 1000 guilders in 1623, 1200 guilders in 1624, 2000 guilders in 1625, and 5500 guilders in 1637. Shortly thereafter, the bottom fell out of the market and prices plummeted to 1/200 of their peak price – a mere 27 guilders. In the artwork above an individual, portrayed in fool’s garment, is shown trading a hefty pouch of gold for a handful of tulip bulbs. It is no mystery who got the better part of that bargain. History teaches us that no era is immune to financial mania including our own. As a matter of fact, a good many believe that we are fully immersed in a stock market mania (wherein many include bitcoin) right now.

Since the earliest days of the USAGOLD website (the mid-1990s), we have enshrined a quote from Thomas Bailey Aldrich at our home page: “The possession of gold has ruined fewer men than the lack of it.” Aldrich’s axiom has held true down through the ages. It applied in ancient Greece and Rome, in 11th century China, in the time of the Medicis, the Dutch Tulipmania, the South Seas Bubble and French fiat money mania, during the long string of panics in the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries (Aldrich’s time), the spate of post World War I and II hyperinflations (Austria, Germany, Greece, Hungary, et al)  and it still applies today.


Ready to swap tulips for gold?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Gold in the age of inflation
The star investment of the fifty-year era and the most reliable store of value

There has been considerable, and some would say tedious, discussion on the subject of inflation over the past several weeks. The Fed wants it. The markets await it. Investors and consumers worry about it. If it does come, the Fed thinks it will be transitory. Others believe it will persist. That said, the current discussion ignores an established historical reality: We already live and have lived with it for a very long time. The Age of Inflation began in August of 1971 when the United States disengaged the dollar from gold and ushered in the fiat money era. Thereafter, the inflationary process has progressively eaten away at our wealth and the purchasing power of our money. Now, some of the best minds in the investment business tell us that it is about to accelerate and that if we ignore it, we do so at our own peril.

To mark the occasion of the fiat money system’s golden anniversary, we offer two instructive charts. One is something of a myth-buster in that gold has decisively outperformed stocks during the fiat money era. Many will be surprised to learn that gold is up 4,500% since 1971, while stocks have played second fiddle at 3,375%. The other reveals at a glance the pernicious, ongoing debasement of the dollar and gold’s role as a hedge against it. The dollar lost 85% of its purchasing power since 1971, while gold, as just mentioned, gained nearly 4500%. If that does not serve as vindication of gold’s portfolio role in the era of fiat money, I don’t know what will. At the same time, consensus has it that cyclically, stocks are closer to a top than a bottom, and gold is closer to a bottom than a top.

Gold and stocks price performance
(In percent, 1971-2021)

area charat showing gold and stocks 1971 to June1 2021 in percent

Chart courtesy of TradingView.com • • • Click to enlarge

Gold and the purchasing power of the dollar
(1971 to present)

overlay area chart showing the value of the dollar and gold since 1971

Sources: St. Louis Federal Reserve [FRED], Bureau of Labor Statistics, ICE Benchmark Administration • • • Click to enlarge

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Celebrate the fifty-year anniversary of the fiat money system with a gold purchase
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

How to spot a bubble
‘Amount of leverage in U.S. equity markets now easily the highest in history.’

Ramirez cartoon of Wall Street blowing speculative trading bubble
Cartoon courtesy of MichaelPRamirez.com

“If you want my opinion,” writes Hussman Fund’s John P. Hussman in a recent analysis, “I suspect that a near-vertical market plunge on the order of 25-35% is coming, probably quite shortly, most likely out of the blue, as in 1987, driven by nothing more than the sudden concerted effort of overextended investors to sell, and the need for a large price adjustment in order to induce scarce buyers to take the other side. As usual, no forecasts are necessary. … This dysfunctional behavior isn’t about any particular video game retailer. I suspect it’s actually about some sort of fragility or segmentation in order-flow mechanisms, possibly coupled with poorly managed derivatives exposure. As I used to teach my students, show me a financial debacle, and I’ll show you someone who had a leveraged, mismatched position that they were suddenly forced to close into an illiquid market. Though my concerns run far beyond the amount of leverage in the system, it isn’t helpful that the amount of leverage in the U.S. equity markets is now easily the highest in history.”

These days spotting the bubble is about as difficult as finding it in the Ramirez cartoon above. Hussman attacks Wall Street’s new rationalization of buying into the bubble, i.e., extreme valuations are justified by low interest rates. Those who are all-in for fear of missing out – blindly walking on air – are obviously the most vulnerable. When investing becomes a matter of faith, that faith will be tested. A solid diversification, we will add, would blunt the downside. Though investor margin debt is small compared to the leverage funds and institutions deploy in the market, it does serve as a bellwether for analysts looking for what might trigger a market crash. SentimenTrader’s Jason Goepfert recently posted a warning to his readers that at $831 billion, we are fast approaching a “year-over-year growth rate in [margin] debt – on both an absolute scale and relative to the change in stock prices – will compare with some of the most egregious extremes in 90 years.”


Are you worried about the egregious extremes in the stock market?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Gold coins, hoofs found in 2,000 year old Chinese tomb

Image of Confucius, old, black and white“Chinese archaeologists. . . discovered 75 gold coins and hoof-shaped ingots in an aristocrat’s tomb that dates back to the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD). The gold objects — 25 gold hoofs and 50 very large gold coins — are the largest single batch of gold items ever found in a Han Dynasty tomb. They were unearthed from the tomb of the first ‘Haihunhou’ (Marquis of Haihun) in east China’s Jiangxi Province. The coins weigh about 250 grams each, while the hoofs’ weights vary from 40 to 250 grams, said Yang Jun, who leads the excavation team.” – Xinhuanet/11-17-2015

These gold artifacts were found along with a portrait of Confucius, perhaps the oldest known. Wisdom and gold make easy company. Confucius once said something that has current applicability:  “In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of.”  Or at the very least, well-hedged ………


Is the wisdom of a hedge in your financial future?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged , , |

Short and Sweet

Blowing up the “Everything Bubble”

graphic image of a harried investor watching the blow-up of the financial bubble

“What the average person fails to understand,” writes Lance Roberts in an analysis posted at the Real Investment Advice website, “is that the next ‘financial crisis’ will not just be a stock market crash, a housing bust, or a collapse in bond prices.  It could be the simultaneous implosion of all three. Whatever causes that change in sentiment is unknown to me or anyone else.  I am not saying with certainty it will happen, as I hope sanity prevails and actions are taken to mitigate the consequences. Unfortunately, history suggests such is unlikely to be the case.”

And, we might add, it is not likely the damage will be restricted to the United States. All the largest and most advanced economies are engaged in rate suppression and quantitative easing schemes. In fact, an implosion in one location could cause corresponding meltdowns in multiple locations. Easy money and heavy leverage have greatly influenced price levels in all markets heightening rollover risks. And then there’s the derivative problem with notional exposure estimated at more than $1 quadrillion, according to Investopedia.


Are you ready for the ultimate derivatives moment?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE

ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

 

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

Worry about the return ‘of’ your money, not just the return ‘on’ it

photograph of a bag of gold coins
There is an old saying among veteran investors to worry not just about the return on your money, but the return of your money. In the wealth game, emphasize defense when you need to, offense when it makes sense. At all times, remain diversified. And by that, we mean real diversification in the form of physical gold and silver coins and/or bullion outside the current fiat money system – not just an assortment of stocks and bonds denominated in the domestic currency. Keep in mind – if the currency erodes in value, the underlying value of those assets erodes along with it. A proper, genuine diversification addresses that problem now and in the future.


Are you ready to deploy genuine diversification in your portfolio?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

What does bitcoin have in common with the ancient stone money of Yap?

“That does not render bitcoin invalid or the blockchain useless,” writes Gillian Tett in a recent Financial Times editorial. “After all, the mainstream currencies on which our lives depend rely on sometimes tenuous social norms as well. One way to frame the contest between bitcoin and fiat currency is thus as a battle of norms — and of distributed versus hierarchical trust.” Tett, perhaps inadvertently, makes a point a good many gold enthusiasts will embrace. Bitcoin is more readily comparable to fiat currencies than gold – as its value rests completely in the faith that it will not be printed without restriction.

Therein lies bitcoin’s ultimate weakness as a store of value. Who’s to say that any number of copycat cryptocurrencies won’t invade the space and undermine bitcoin’s value? (In fact, a good many already have with varying degrees of success.) Who’s to say that some enterprising software geek doesn’t find a way into the blockchain and begins producing bitcoin willy-nilly? (Which is what happened, by the way, to yap stone money. [More]) Tett ends her essay with some advice for Elon Musk – a new and ardent supporter of bitcoin: “Perhaps Musk’s next trip should be to Micronesia, where those now-useless stone circles still litter the landscape as a sign of what happens when norms and patterns of trust change.” To get to the heart of what Tett – an anthropologist as well as a first-rate journalist – means by that statement, you will need to read her essay in its entirety at the link above. In Musk’s defense, he also expressed an interest in Tesla building its gold reserves.


Are you worried about your savings going the way of the stone money of Yap?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short & Sweet

Ubiquity, complexity, and sandpiles
Contemplating the impact of that last grain of sand

photograph of a pyramid shaped sandpile illustrating angle of repose and also vulnerability

For a long while, John Mauldin (Mauldin Economics) has been one of the more thoughtful big picture analysts – someone whose work we read regularly. In a recent reflection posted at the GoldSeek website, he begins with a section on a Brookhaven National Laboratories study of sandpiles. Researchers attempted to ascertain at which point, and to what degree, the last grain of sand falling on the pile causes disequilibrium and the collapse of the pile. It found that the impact of the last grain of sand varied. It “might trigger only a few tumblings or it might instead set off a cataclysmic chain reaction involving millions.”

“We cannot accurately predict when the avalanche will happen,” Mauldin concludes. “You can miss out on all sorts of opportunities because you see lots of fingers of instability and ignore the base of stability. And then you can lose it all at once because you ignored the fingers of instability. You need your portfolios to both participate and protect. Don’t blindly buy index funds and assume they will recover as they did in the past. This next avalanche is going to change the nature of recoveries as other market forces and new technologies change what makes an investment succeed. I cannot stress that enough. Don’t get caught in a buy-and-hold, traditional 60/40 portfolio. Don’t walk away from it. Run away.”

So why would the story of the last grain of sand hitting the pile before it begins to dissemble be important? “The peculiar and exceptionally unstable organization of the critical state,” says Mark Buchanan, who wrote a book on catastrophes of all kinds (and referenced by Mauldin), “does indeed seem to be ubiquitous in our world. Researchers in the past few years have found its mathematical fingerprints in the workings of all the upheavals I’ve mentioned so far [earthquakes, eco-disasters, market crashes], as well as in the spreading of epidemics, the flaring of traffic jams, the patterns by which instructions trickle down from managers to workers in the office, and in many other things.” There comes a breaking point a which time the result is uncontrollable.


Worried about the sandpiles building in various markets?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

 

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short & Sweet

‘Hello, Mr. Gold Bullion, have you noticed what they’re doing?’
Grant weighs in on the fiftieth anniversary of the fiat money system

image showing the blur of high speed money printing press running at full tilt

The retrospectives on the Nixon shock continue to poured in at the end of this past August – the month fifty years ago when the Nixon administration severed the link between the dollar and gold and ushered in the fiat money era in which we are still immersed. The repertoire, though, would not be complete without a few words from James Grant – one of the great critics and chief chroniclers of the era through his highly recommended newsletter, Interest Rate Observer. The following are excerpts from an interview of Grant published by Sprott, the Canadian gold firm, in mid-August. Grant ends the exchange hosted by the firm’s Ed Coyne with an admission: “I think I spilled my entire bits of wisdom here on the counter!” We want to thank Sprott for permission to quote the interview at length. The full exchange is available at the previously highlighted link.

James Grant –

“It’s immensely frustrating, right? Because where you see heterodoxy posing as the gospel truth, we see heresy wrapped up as sound policy. And you keep on saying, ‘Hello, Mr. Gold Bullion, have you noticed what they’re saying and doing? Have you noticed that the Fed’s balance sheet doubled during the pandemic? Have you noticed that the Fed is talking about nurturing a rate of inflation higher than its target in the midst of evidence accelerating inflation? Have you noticed any of this?’ We address this new thing called gold bullion and gold bullion keeps on slumbering …

“Gold has a way of disappointing its most devoted adherents. In 2008-09 it broke people’s hearts and went down. ‘This is a crisis!’ Gold is an ancient medium that appears in the periodic table. I didn’t invent it. Some people think I invented it! It appears in the periodic table, it’s an old thing and it takes its sweet time, right. It has a kind of a geological time set, that’s its clock: geological. Over the sweep of a reasonable investment horizon, it protects against the depredations of the stewards of our currencies. That’s what its purpose is. And that’s what it mainly does. Over the course of fiscal quarters and even some years, it will disappoint, but over the course of a reasonable investment, long-term horizon, it will spare you the punishment that our central bankers so willfully are meting out.

[Y]ou really have to take these things in with a great grain of salt and just say, all right, what I have here in gold, and very cheap gold equities, by the way, what I have here is an investment in monetary disorder, not a protection against it. We have it (monetary disorder) already. Monetary disorder is in fact the monetary system. It is an inherently disorderly system. In gold, you have an investment in that you do well, the more disorderly it becomes and especially well when the world recognizes the essential chaos of our monetary institutions.”


Thinking about making an investment in monetary disorder?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

 

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet
‘Wannabes’ and ‘Gonnabes’  not the real thing

photograph of gold bullion coins and historic gold coins USAGOLD

‘Put differently, as long as humans remain tangible, it is likely that they maintain a desire to hold real and tangible assets. Very few companies on the US stock exchange, for example, are older than 50 years. By comparison, gold has existed for thousands of years and any gold coin or gold bar will most likely outlive any company and their stocks and bonds. Put together, it is unlikely that a company that sells claims on gold, such as a gold ETF, will beat physical gold’s longevity.” – Dick Baur, Professor of Finance, University of Western Australia (Why ‘digital gold’ won’t ever kill off the real thing)

Wannabe and gonnabe paper gold and silver will never pass for history’s time-honored store of value – nor will it be mistaken for actual gold coins or bars stored nearby should the cold wind blow. By the way, adding the word, blockchain, to a paper gold product might enhance its marketing appeal, but it changes nothing in terms of its usefulness to the investor.  The instrument is still paper gold and little more than a price bet.

Full article link


Don’t wannabe a ‘wannabee’? Ready for the real thing?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ORDER GOLD & SILVER ONLINE 24-7

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short & Sweet

Facing down our investment fears
Courage comes from a strategy you can genuinely believe in

graphci image of sheep standing atop each other to face down wolf

“As markets shake off their summer slumbers,” writes London-based analyst Bill Blain, “what should we be worrying about? Lots..! From real vs transitory inflation arguments, the long-term economic consequences of Covid, the future for Central Banking unable to unravel its Gordian knot of monetary experimentation, and the prospects for rising political instability in the US and Europe.”

Facing down your investment fears can only come from a strategy you can genuinely believe in. One of the great quotes on gold ownership came many years ago from Richard Russell, the now-deceased editor of the Dow Theory Letters. “I still sleep better at night,” he wrote, “knowing that I hold some gold. If or when everything else falls apart, gold will still be unquestioned wealth.” It is not a complicated strategy, but it is an effective one.

Though rarely discussed, gold ownership has as much to do with personal philosophy and how we wish to conduct our lives as it does finance and economics. In many ways, it is a rational portfolio decision that suits the times, but it is also a lifestyle decision that provides some peace of mind no matter what happens with the pandemic, the mania on Wall Street, or the political maneuvering in Washington D.C.


Looking to sleep better at night?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE

ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com

ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7

Reliably serving physical gold and silver investors since 1973

Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged |

Short and Sweet

headline for nine lessons from prosperous investors

We first introduced our readers to these nine lessons all the way back in 1999. They were passed along to us by the legendary commodity market analyst R.E. McMaster, formerly editor of The Reaper newsletter. The original source for the nine lessons was a highly regarded money manager who handled accounts for wealthy Greek and Mexican merchant families.

1. It is easier to make a fortune than keep it.

2. Intelligence is an inadequate substitute for wisdom. Wisdom fears, respects the unknown and fosters humility. Intelligence can lead to self-destructive arrogance and ultimate failure.

3. Risk must have premium, and we must understand it well.

4. There is no order. There is no formula. There is no equation that works all of the time. It works just long enough to fool just a few more of us just a little longer.

5. What we fail to remember is that a paper gain is just that. Paper. Worth nothing. Not until we say sell, and not until we get cash. Anything less is just that.

6. When the Bass Brothers in Texas write a check for real money, their money, to buy 25% of the Freeport McMoran Gold Series II, we take notice. When the Fidelity Magellan Fund buys a fifty-million in Dell computer, we yawn. So, should you. It is other people’s money.

7. Slick advertising budgets, powerful computers and few slabs of marble do not, by themselves, make a great financial institution.

8.  Never invest in anything you do not feel comfortable with or understand well.

9.  When a thousand people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing.


Is the wisdom of a portfolio hedge in your future?
DISCOVER THE USAGOLD DIFFERENCE
ORDER DESK: 1-800-869-5115 x100/orderdesk@usagold.com
ONLINE ORDER DESK-24/7
Share
Posted in Short and Sweet, Today's top gold news and opinion | Tagged , , |