Why British sovereigns are the best selling historic gold bullion coin

Global market
Historic British sovereigns minted in the late 19th and early 20th century are traded all over the world especially in nation states that used to be part of the old British empire – India, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Africa, Australia, Canada – even the United States.

Liquid market
A client of USAGOLD tells an interesting story.  He has always had an interest in gold – even as a young man when he served in the military. When he was stationed in Viet Nam during the war, he recalls being astonished upon visiting villages far off the beaten track, that he would find merchants willing to trade for merchandise using the gold British sovereign in payment.  Too, American pilots and special forces units were issued British sovereigns as part of their survival pack simply because they were accepted in payment in so many places around the world.  Today, the British sovereign remains one of the most highly traded historic bullion gold coins in the world with buy-sell spreads posted daily wherever gold is traded.

Low premiums
Because of the strong global liquidity, British sovereigns have always tracked the gold price and sold at reasonable premiums over the gold price.  For today’s pricing, we invite you to go here.

Privacy/Confiscation
As historic gold coins with a provenance dating before 1933, British sovereigns fall within the category of items excluded from the U.S. government seizure of gold in 1933 and the subsequent ownership ban of gold bullion that extended to 1975.  A large number of our clientele choose to purchase historic bullion items because they track the gold price, provide good liquidity and trade at relatively low premiums over the gold price.  If you would like to learn more about privacy issues surrounding gold and how you might hedge the possibility of a future gold seizure, we invite you to visit this in-depth study titled Preparing for a Potential Gold Confiscation.


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