Category: BoJ

BOJ to persist with monetary easing to boost inflation: Kuroda

Reuters/John Revill/11-13-17

The Bank of Japan will continue to persist with “powerful monetary easing” to nurture positive inflation developments, BoJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said in Zurich on Monday.

“Going forward, with the output gap improving steadily, firms’ stance is likely to gradually shift toward raising wages and prices,” Kuroda said in a lecture at the University of Zurich. “If further price rises come to be widespread, inflation expectations are likely to rise steadily.”

PG View: The BoJ has been saying the same thing for more than 20-years . . .

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Posted in BoJ, Central Banks, Deflation, inflation, Monetary Policy, QE |

Bank of Japan keeps policy on hold


FT/Robin Harding/10-31-17

The Bank of Japan has kept monetary policy on hold as it made slight downgrades to inflation forecasts but predicted steady economic expansion.

It kept short-term interest rates at minus 0.1 per cent, a cap on 10-year bond yields at “around zero” and pledged to carry on buying assets at a pace of ¥80tn a year as it strives to end two decades of on-and-off deflation.

The continued optimism of the bank’s inflation forecasts suggests it believes the economy is on track and there is no need for extra monetary stimulus.

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Posted in BoJ, Central Banks, Monetary Policy, QE |

Outside the Box Low Inflation Is No “Mystery”

Mauldin Economics/John Mauldin/09-27-17

When is a mystery not a mystery? When Janet Yellen is puzzling over a lack of inflation, that’s when. So say Brian Wesbury, chief economist, and Robert Stein, deputy chief economist of First Trust, in today’s Outside the Box. The bottom line: QE didn’t work, and Janet knew it was unlikely to work, from the start.

…So forgive us for asking, but after unprecedented expansion of banking reserves and the Fed balance sheet, with little inflation, is it really a “mystery?” Or, is it proof of what we believed all along: QE didn’t work?

…instead of boosting Milton Friedman’s key money number (M2), the excess monetary base growth went into “excess reserves” – money the banks hold as deposits, but don’t lend out. Money in the warehouse (or in this case, credits on a computer) doesn’t boost demand! This is why real GDP and inflation (nominal GDP) never accelerated in line with monetary base growth.

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Posted in BoE, BoJ, Central Banks, ECB, Fed, inflation, Monetary Policy, QE |