Why Doesn’t Gold Get The Respect It Deserves?

Sprott/Trey Reik/11-08-17

Eight years of zero interest rate policy (ZIRP) have compressed returns across a wide spectrum of institutional investment regimens. Especially in the pension and endowment world, few portfolios are achieving chartered rates of return. In this environment, we find it puzzling that institutional investors still choose to ignore gold’s market-leading returns. As shown in Figure 1, gold has generated positive annual returns in 14 of the past 17 years. What is even more impressive is gold’s performance compared to the S&P 500 Index, the benchmark for broad U.S. equity performance. Gold’s compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for the 16.75 years (2001 to September 30, 2017) stands at 9.68 percent versus 6.01 percent for the S&P 500 Index (dividends reinvested). Indeed, it is fair to say that since the turn of the millennium, any long-term allocation to gold would have improved total returns for the vast majority of pension and endowment portfolios.

…To us, the most interesting aspect of gold’s dogged performance since the beginning of 2001 has been the wide variety of financial, monetary and asset-market conditions that have prevailed during the various years in which gold has advanced. Along the way, every popular variable to which some portion of consensus attributes strong gold correlation has oscillated repeatedly, yet gold has advanced in the overwhelming majority of these years.

PG View: Gold is a critical component in a well diversified portfolio. Reik points out that the “the S&P 500, measured in gold terms, remains 64 percent lower today than at its 2000 peak.” That reality reflects the fact that the the U.S. — and the world for that matter — is awash in fiat currency as a result of more than a decade of über-accommodative central bank policies. When the correction comes, the foundation of fiat will crumble. Shore yours up with some gold.

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