Germany brings its gold stash home sooner than planned

Reuters/Andreas Framke/2-9-2017

But with Europe stumbling from crisis to crisis, the German public has grown uneasy about keeping the gold abroad. Some even argue the world’s second biggest bullion reserve may be needed to back a new deutschmark, should the euro zone break up.

MK note:   Germany has completed its transfer from the New York Fed and 91 tonnes still need to be transferred to Frankfurt from the Bank of France.  Germany will now leave 1236 tonnes at the New York Fed and another 432 tonnes in London.  The remainder of its 3378 tonne national holding will be stored in Frankfurt.  The repatriation transfers to Frankfurt were completed three years ahead of schedule.

With respect to the gold left at the Fed, Bundesbank’s Carl-Ludwig Thiele told reporters: “We have a lot of discussions about (U.S. President Donald) Trump, regarding implications on monetary policy, macroeconomics, etc., but we trust the central bank of the U.S.”

The irony here is that when Hjalmar Schacht, head of Germany’s central bank in the 1920s visited the New York Fed, he asked to see Germany’s gold stored in its vaults.  “Strong**,” wrote Schacht in a 1955 autobiography, “was proud to be able to show us the vaults which were situated in the deepest cellar of the building and remarked: ‘Now, Herr Schacht, you shall see where the Reichsbank gold is kept.’ ”  Storage staff went off to retrieve the gold.  “At length,” Schacht goes on, “we were told: ‘Mr. Strong, we can’t find the Reichsbank gold.’ ”  To which Schacht replied: “Never mind; I believe you when you say the gold is there. Even if it weren’t you are good for its replacement.”  One need presume that nearly 100 years later, the level of trust conveyed by Schacht remains in place.

It is unlikely that Germany would back a new Deutschmark with gold directly, but having an asset set aside that is detached from erratic national currencies in this day and age is a wise move for the prudent nation state – just as it is for prudent the private investor.

** New York Fed president at the time, Benjamin Strong

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